Thursday, October 18, 2012

More Addition on a Hundred Chart


A friend recently explained to me how her daughter was showing her thinking for adding on a hundred chart, and I was intrigued.  I asked her to send me a picture:


I love how the kids are showing their hundred chart thinking without the actual hundred chart.  Notice also that they are apparently required to show their thinking two ways--in this case with an open number line and the partial hundred chart.

I made a little freebie that can be used to practice this type of recording.  But as you see in the picture above, a simple word problem and a composition book work wonders!




18 comments:

  1. Great idea! I loved the freebie! You have been Boo-ed head over and join the fun! Fun in K/1

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  2. Thanks for another great activity. I find myself checking almost every day to see what helpful things you have posted. Your blog has been a great help to me!

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    1. Thanks so much. That's a huge compliment! :)

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  3. This is awesome! Thank you for sharing!

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  4. Printing this out to try to help my little low kids see how to do this. Thanks for sharing! Sara

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    1. Sure thing, Sara! It really helps them understand what's going on behind all that regrouping. :)

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  5. Thank you for your blog and all that it entails! You are really helping me to become a better ESL teacher.

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    1. So happy that you're finding my work useful. :)

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  6. Am I blind, or are you guys? 'Cause I don't see anyone adding hundreds to anything on this page. And I don't see how this chart would work with adding hundreds, either. How are you supposed to use this method to add 354+489?

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    1. This is a post about using a hundred chart to add, not adding hundreds. Although you could use similar methods: 354 + 400 is 754. 754 + 90 is 844, but I have to take 1 off because I only needed to add 89. So the sum would be 843.

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  7. I think this is a crazy way to teach kids how to add and subtract.

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    1. I do, too, Holly. It seems horribly inefficient and doesn't enforce the concept of quantity. Do you, or any one else understand the rationale for this approach?

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    2. This is merely one piece of the overall picture. Students do LOTS of work with manipulatives to build the concept of quantity. They also move on to more efficient strategies. This particular activity helps build an understanding of the importance of place value in addition and subtraction by using the patterns in a hundred chart. It is a stepping stone to the traditional algorithm.

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  8. What age group is this appropriate for? Someone posted their kindergartner being assigned this worksheet for homework we are thinking this is developmentally inappropriate.

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Comments make me smile! :)

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